Research

Simon Hammond's citationsIn general, my research interests lie in modelling self-adaptive systems, particularly those which support the spontaneous emergence of complex, adaptive structures.

Evolutionary Algorithms

In 2007 I took a PhD in computer science from the University of Birmingham in the area of evolutionary computation under the supervision of Prof. Xin Yao: Adaptive Scaling of Evolvable Systems. An outcome of this research was an algorithm for solving hard optimisation problems via scale-free coevolution.
I went on to research the potential of this model to produce aesthetically pleasing abstract designs with the ImageBreeder online project.

Modelling social networks

From around 2002 to 2008 I experimented with a mobile status-posting application called Bodtracker/Bodder. My interest was in exploring the potential of expanded, real-time social awareness. To this end I implemented crowds, circles, channels and photo uploads.

Adaptive Online Learning

Making online learning more adaptive was a goal of the STACK project for which I provided e technical lead from 2008. It used a computer algebra system to pose advanced mathematical questions to undergraduates in an open-ended way and intelligently process their answers for rich, specific feedback.

Publications

  • David Fowler, Martin Szomszor, Simon Hammond, John Lawrenson and Patty Kostkova (2011) Engagement in Online Medical Communities of Practice in Healthcare: Analysis of Messages and Social Networks. Proceedings of 4th International Conference on eHealth. Málaga, Spain.
  • Hammond, S.P., & Sangwin, C.J. (2007) Enhancing traditional teaching through the STACK CAA system. Proceedings of 5th Joining Educational Mathematics Workshop. Finnish Institute, Paris.
  • Hammond, S.P. (2007) Adaptive Scaling of Evolvable Systems. PhD thesis accepted at School of Computer Science, University of Birmingham, UK.
  • Hammond, S.P. (2003) Putting the user in the loop: on-line user adaption of genetic algorithms. Proceedings of Congress on Evolutionary Computation (CEC 2003). Canberra, Australia.